Category Archives: Rule of Law

Demonizing the President

Biden in his anti-Trump/MAGA speech at Independence Hall. 1 September 2022

It’s not hard to demonize a president, and sometimes they make it even easier. The Hitler-esque fists and the demon-red lighting on the facade of Independence Hall in this photo of Mr. Biden would be easy to criticize, even if the speech had been about something as benign as butterflies or wedding mints.

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Federal Student Loans Were Illegal in the First Place

The student loans that are getting so much attention at present were never legal in the first place. Under our Constitution, the United States Congress never has had authority to initiate such a program. Had the people of the United States nipped it in the bud, it wouldn’t be biting them on the heinie right now.

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Resolution for 9/11?

It’s been 21 years now since it happened. Have you paid enough attention yet to figure out that the official 9/11 Commission explanation is bogus? And have you paid enough attention to figure out that one of the most popular alternate explanations is also bogus? Or have you long-since given up on investigating it?

And if you’re one of the millions who doesn’t believe the official government report, are you actively pushing for criminal prosecution? Or have you long-since given up on justice?

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The Behavioral Theory on which the US Constitution was Based Has Been Overturned

People used to think that humans could generally be counted on to act rationally in their own best interests. This idea is generally called something like the Standard Economic Model, but the cognitive science of the past few decades has blown this idea out of the water, beyond any hope of return. We now know better—that people frequently think, decide, believe, and act in ways that are irrational, and that end up being against their own best interests.

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After Roe v. Wade: Back to the Raging Sea of Federalism

It was never supposed to be an easy ride. The various states, each with their own quirks and personalities and goals, had agreed to join together, but only for limited purposes—banding together mostly to protect their rights from violators within and without the Union. They were not signing up in order to give away their routine powers of self-rule to a central government. Each would continue to rule its own affairs, except when it came to those limited purposes behind the Union. As summarized in the Preamble to our Constitution, those purposes were these:

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